Tag Archives: fruit

Scripture at Sunrise 5.23.2016

Judged by Works | Romans 2:6-10 | Steve Wainright
“He will render to each one according to his works.” -Romans 2:6

God’s judgment is coming on man because of sin. Here He is laying down the standard and principles by which they will be judged.

In this passage, we take a look at how we are judged according to our works. We are judged according to the things we do in life. Does your life display obedience or disobedience? (This is not referring to salvation, but judgment. Salvation is all by God’s grace. We do not work for it; however, we do good things as a result of our salvation.)

We are born again to do good works. When we do good works, we glorify God–and that’s the whole purpose. A lot of times you don’t see the fruits of your labor in the midst of your labor, but be patient in well-doing.

——-Audio——-
Sunday Morning Sermon Audio: Judged by Works | Romans 2:6-10 | Steve Wainright
Sunday Evening Sermon Audio: The Savior in the Sign | John 2:1-11 | Anthony Vance

Scripture at Sunrise 3.30.2015

Sunday Morning | Pastor Steve Wainright | The Fruit Produced by the Spirit (Part 2) | Galatians 5:22-25
“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. If we live by the Spirit, let us also keep in step with the Spirit.” -Galatians 5:22-25

The only way we can do what God tells us to do is by divine power. The Spirit must dwell within us. When we abide in Christ, our lives will produce a multifaceted singular fruit of love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, meekness, and self-control. Is this fruit being displayed in your life?

——-Audio——-
*Click here for Sunday Morning Sermon Audio: The Fruit Produced by the Spirit (Part 2) (Galatians 5:22-25)

Scripture at Sunrise 5.27.2014

For if these things be in you, and abound, they make you that ye shall neither be barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. -2 Peter 1:8

If we desire to glorify our Lord by fruitfulness, we must have certain things within us; for nothing can come out of us which is not first of all within us. We must begin with faith, which is the groundwork of all the virtues; and then diligently add to it virtue, knowledge, temperance, and patience. With these we must have godliness and brotherly love. All these put together will most assuredly cause us to produce, as our life fruit, the clusters of usefulness, and we shall not be mere idle knowers but real doers of the Word. These holy things must not only be in us, but abound, or we shall be barren. Fruit is the overflow of life, and we must be full before we can flow over.

We have noticed men of considerable parts and opportunities who have never succeeded in doing real good in the conversion of souls; and after close observation we have concluded that they lacked certain graces which are absolutely essential to fruit bearing. For real usefulness, graces are better than gifts. As the man is, so is his work. If we would do better, we must be better. Let the text be a gentle hint to unfruitful professors and to myself also.

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon]

Scripture at Sunrise 7.29.2013

And He told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard, and he came seeking fruit on it and found none. And he said to the vinedresser, ‘Look, for three years now I have come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and I find none. Cut it down. Why should it use up the ground?’ And he answered him, ‘Sir, let it alone this year also, until I dig around it and put on manure. Then if it should bear fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’” -Luke 13:6-9

Has the world gotten so tight around you that your roots aren’t going deeper? Christ the Gardner will dig in your heart and aerate it. Sometimes it hurts, but it’s for your good. He strikes at your lusts, pleasures, securities, and comforts. He digs at that to make you faithful and fruitful. The Father is looking for fruit.

[from 7.28.2013 Sunday Morning Sermon by Pastor Steve Wainright on Luke 13:6-9]

Scripture at Sunrise 8.9.2011

“Every branch in Me that beareth not fruit He taketh away: and every branch that beareth fruit, He purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit.” -John 15:2

This is a precious promise to one who lives for fruitfulness. At first it seems to wear a sharp aspect. Must the fruitful bough be pruned? Must the knife cut even the best and most useful? No doubt it is so, for very much of our Lord’s purging work is done by means of afflictions of one kind or another. It is not the evil but the good who have the promise of tribulation in this life. But, then, the end makes more than full amends for the painful nature of the means. If we may bring forth more fruit for our Lord, we will not mind the pruning and the loss of leafage.

Still, purging is sometimes wrought by the Word apart from trial, and this takes away whatever appeared rough in the flavor of the promise. We shall by the Word be made more gracious and more useful. The Lord who has made us, in a measure, fruit-bearing, will operate upon us till we reach a far higher degree of fertility. Is not this a great joy? Truly there is more comfort in a promise of fruitfulness than if we had been warranted riches, or health, or honor.

Lord Jesus, speedily fulfill Thy gracious word to me and cause me to abound in fruit to Thy praise!

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon, August 9 entry]

Scripture at Sunrise 8.31.2010

“Sing, O barren.”  –Isaiah 54:1

Though we have brought forth some fruit unto Christ, and have a joyful hope that we are “plants of his own right hand planting,” yet there are times when we feel very barren. Prayer is lifeless, love is cold, faith is weak, each grace in the garden of our heart languishes and droops. We are like flowers in the hot sun, requiring the refreshing shower. In such a condition what are we to do? The text is addressed to us in just such a state. “Sing, O barren, break forth and cry aloud.” But what can I sing about? I cannot talk about the present, and even the past looks full of barrenness. Ah! I can sing of Jesus Christ. I can talk of visits which the Redeemer has aforetimes paid to me; or if not of these, I can magnify the great love wherewith he loved his people when he came from the heights of heaven for their redemption. I will go to the cross again. Come, my soul, heavy laden thou wast once, and thou didst lose thy burden there. Go to Calvary again. Perhaps that very cross which gave thee life may give thee fruitfulness. What is my barrenness? It is the platform for his fruit-creating power. What is my desolation? It is the black setting for the sapphire of his everlasting love. I will go in poverty, I will go in helplessness, I will go in all my shame and backsliding, I will tell him that I am still his child, and in confidence in his faithful heart, even I, the barren one, will sing and cry aloud.

Sing, believer, for it will cheer thine own heart, and the hearts of other desolate ones. Sing on, for now that thou art really ashamed of being barren, thou wilt be fruitful soon; now that God makes thee loath to be without fruit he will soon cover thee with clusters. The experience of our barrenness is painful, but the Lord’s visitations are delightful. A sense of our own poverty drives us to Christ, and that is where we need to be, for in him is our fruit found.

[from Spurgeon’s Morning & Evening, August 28 evening entry]