Tag Archives: lyrics

Scripture at Sunrise 12.18.2013

“And being found in human form, He humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.” -Philippians 2:8

How sweet the day when Christ was born
When God Himself took human form
He came to wash our sins away
Our death to die, our debt to pay

-Stephen Altrogge, “How Sweet the Day”

Scripture at Sunrise 3.22.2012

 

“Be filled with the Spirit,  addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ…” -Ephesians 5:18-20

Sing God’s Word. Lyrics matter more than music. Truth transcends tunes.  -Bob Kauflin via Twitter

Scripture at Sunrise 8.17.2011

“So teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom.” -Psalm 90:12

Teach us to count the days. Teach us to make the days count. –Chris Rice “Life Means So Much”

A Song for Your Friday

I had the privilege of going to an Andrew Peterson concert last night on UK’s campus. I fell in love with Peterson’s music back in the fall and could listen to his music all day long; however, there’s something really special about seeing him sing live because you get to hear the stories behind his songs and see his emotion as he sings them. It was certainly a blessing.

I have a lot of favorites. I’ve never disliked one of his songs. This one I’m going to share with you today has such beautiful words. You will see that Peterson is careful with his words and uses each to the fullest. He’s a brilliant storyteller.

“Hosanna” means “save us now.” It was a Hebrew word that became a shout of praise. How beautiful that when you cry for help, it also becomes a shout of praise because you’re acknowledging your own sinfulness and realizing that Christ is the only one who can help.

“Hosanna” – Matthew 21:9, John 2:19, Genesis 3:15, Matthew 27:51
Words and Music by Andrew Peterson, Ben Shive, and Andy Gullahorn as heard on Resurrection Letters, Volume II (2008)

I am tangled up in contradiction.
I am strangled by my own two hands.
I am hunted by the hounds of addiction.
Hosanna!

I have lied to everyone who trusts me.
I have tried to fall when I could stand.
I have only loved the ones who loves me.
Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
See the long awaited king come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Come and tear the temple down.
Raise it up on holy ground. Hosanna!

I have struggled to remove this raiment,
tried to hide every shimmering strand.
I contend with these ghosts and these hosts of bright angels.
Hosanna!

I have cursed the man that you have made me,
as I have nursed the beast that bays for my blood.
Oh, I have run from the one who would save me.
Save me, Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
See the long awaited king, come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Come and tear the temple down.
Raise it up on holy ground. Hosanna!

You have crushed beneath your heel the vile serpent.
You have carried to the grave the black stain.
You have torn apart the temple’s holy curtain.
You have beaten Death at Death’s own game.
Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
Hail the long awaited king, come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Won’t you tear this temple down,
raise it up on holy ground.
O Hosanna! I will lift my voice and sing:
You have come and washed me clean. Hosanna.

Scripture at Sunrise 4.23.2010

“The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.”  -Lamentations 3:22-23

Mercies Anew
Every morning that breaks,
There are mercies anew.
Every breath that I take
Is your faithfulness proved.
And at the end of each day,
When my labors are through,
I will sing of Your mercies anew.

When I’ve fallen and strayed
There were mercies anew.
For you sought me in love
And my heart you pursued.
In the face of my sin
Lord, You never withdrew,
So I sing of Your mercies anew.

And Your mercies, they will never end
For ten thousand years they’ll remain.
And when this world’s beauty has passed away
Your mercies will be unchanged.

And when the storms swirl and rage
There are mercies anew.
In affliction and pain
You will carry me through.
And at the end of my days,
When Your throne fills my view,
I will sing of Your mercies anew.
I will sing of Your mercies anew.

[by Bob Kauflin and Mark Altrogge of Sovereign Grace Music; as recorded on “Upward: The Hymns Project”]

Scripture at Sunrise 4.9.2010

“When Jesus had received the vinegar, He said, ‘It is finished’; and He bowed His head and gave up His spirit.”  -John 19:30

Beneath the Cross of Jesus by Elizabeth Cecelia Clephane (1830-1869)
Beneath the cross of jesus
I fain would take my stand—
The shadow of a mighty Rock
Within a weary land;
A home within the wilderness,
A rest upon the way,
From the burning of the noontide heat,
And the burden of the day.

Upon that cross of Jesus
Mine eye at times can see
The very dying form of One
Who suffered there for me;
And from my smitten heart with tears
Two wonders I confess—
The wonders of redeeming love
And my unworthiness.

I take, O cross, thy shadow
For my abiding place;
I ask no other sunshine than
The sunshine of His face;
Content to let the world go by,
To know no gain nor loss,
My sinful self my only shame,
My glory all the cross.

Story Behind the Song
Compliments of Hymntime/Click for linkElizabeth Cecelia Clephane spent her whole life in Scotland. Daughter of a county sheriff, she grew up in the village of Melrose.  She suffered from poor health most of her life, but that didn’tkeep her from serving others.  She regularly helped the poor and those with disabilities, even selling a horse and carriage to give mroe money.  Her cheery attitude and selfless spirit earned her the nickname, “The Sunbeam of Melrose.” 

She wrote eight hymns in her lifetime, including “The Ninety and Nine.” A Presbyterian, Clephane filled her hymns with biblical images. In this hymn, she gathers various biblical examples of restoration and protection, uniting them with the benefits of the Cross.  Thus the Cross becomes a rock that offers shade to the desert traveler.  It’s a home in the wilderness, a rest stop for the exhausted wanderer. 

The “two wonders” that the author confesses in this hymn are Christ’s love and her own unworthiness.  These are common themes for Christian writers.  Even the apostle Paul suggested that someone might give his life for a good person, but marveled that God showed His love to us “while we were still sinners” (Romans 5:8).

[From The One Year Book of Hymns, April 12 entry]

Scripture at Sunrise 1.29.10

“And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to His purpose.”  -Romans 8:28

There is something indescribably beautiful about hymns in another language, especially when they have rich words to begin with. This one is sung by Haitian-American Davidson Jean-ReJouis in Creole and English as a message of hope to his homeland.

God Moves in a Mysterious Way

  1. God moves in a mysterious way
    His wonders to perform;
    He plants His footsteps in the sea
    And rides upon the storm.
  2. Deep in unfathomable mines
    Of never failing skill
    He treasures up His bright designs
    And works His sov’reign will.
  3. Ye fearful saints, fresh courage take;
    The clouds ye so much dread
    Are big with mercy and shall break
    In blessings on your head.
  4. Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,
    But trust Him for His grace;
    Behind a frowning providence
    He hides a smiling face.
  5. His purposes will ripen fast,
    Unfolding every hour;
    The bud may have a bitter taste,
    But sweet will be the flow’r.
  6. Blind unbelief is sure to err
    And scan His work in vain;
    God is His own interpreter,
    And He will make it plain.

Chorus:
Be still, be still, oh my soul and know
That God is sitting on His throne.
Be still, be still, oh my soul and know
That God works all things for His glory and my good.

[Words by William Cowper, arranged by Kelley Coppage]