Tag Archives: meditation

Scripture at Sunrise 1.17.2018

“Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.” -Philippians 4:8

What controls the meditation of your thoughts and what commands the focus of your desires, will then exercise control over the things you say and do. -Paul Tripp via Twitter

Scripture at Sunrise 4.10.2012

Great peace have they which love Thy law: and nothing shall offend them. -Psalm 119:165

Yes, a true love for the great Book will bring us great peace from the great God and be a great protection to us. Let us live constantly in the society of the law of the Lord, and it will breed in our hearts a restfulness such as nothing else can. The Holy Spirit acts as a Comforter through the Word and sheds abroad those benign influences which calm the tempests of the soul.

Nothing is a stumbling block to the man who has the Word of God dwelling in him richly. He takes up his daily cross, and it becomes a delight. For the fiery trial he is prepared and counts it not strange, so as to be utterly cast down by it. He is neither stumbled by prosperity — as so many are — nor crushed by adversity — as others have been — for he lives beyond the changing circumstances of external life. When his Lord puts before him some great mystery of the faith which makes others cry, “This is an hard saying; who can hear it?” the believer accepts it without question; for his intellectual difficulties are overcome by his reverent awe of the law of the Lord, which is to him the supreme authority to which he joyfully bows. Lord, work in us this love, this peace, this rest, this day.

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon]

Scripture at Sunrise 4.3.2012

“Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them, that thy profiting may appear to all.” -1 Timothy 4:15

This is, practically, a promise that, by diligent meditation and the giving up of our whole mind to our work for the Lord we shall make a progress which all can see. Not by hasty reading but by deep meditation we profit by the Word of God. Not by doing a great deal of work in a slovenly manner, but by giving our best thought to what we attempt, we shall get real profit. “In all labor there is profit” but not in fuss and hurry without true heart-energy.

If we divide ourselves between God and mammon, or Christ and self, we shall make no progress. We must give ourselves wholly to holy things, or else we shall be poor traders in heavenly business, and at our stocktaking no profit will be shown.

Am I a minister? Let me be a minister wholly and not spend my energies upon secondary concerns. What have I to do with party politics or vain amusements? Am I a Christian? Let me make my service of Jesus my occupation, my lifework, my one pursuit. We must be in-and-in with Jesus, and then out-and-out for Jesus, or else we shall make neither progress nor profit, and neither the church nor the world will feel the forceful influence which the Lord would have us exercise.

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon]

Scripture @ Sunrise 2.12.09

“‘For My thoughts are not your thoughts,
neither are your ways My ways,’ declares the Lord.
‘For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
so are My ways higher than your ways
and My thoughts than your thoughts.'”  -Isaiah 55:8-9



Happy 200th Birthday, President Lincoln! 

As many of you know, I took a class last semester titled, “Lincoln: The Writer.”  I did not even know the title of the course until I went to class.  The time just fit with my schedule well.  Little did I know that I would become a huge fan of Abraham Lincoln and gain a greater respect for the marble man by looking at his intricate writing process. 

So today, on his bicentennial, I share with you one of my favorite private pieces he wrote in the midst of the Civil War and slavery. 

Lincoln’s Meditation on the Divine Will
“The will of God prevails. In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be, wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time. In the present civil war it is quite possible that God’s purpose is something different from the purpose of either party; and yet the human instrumentalities, working just as they do, are of the best adaptation to effect his purpose. I am almost ready to say that this is probably true; that God wills this contest, and wills that it shall not end yet. By his mere great power on the minds of the now contestants, he could have either saved or destroyed the Union without a human contest. Yet the contest began. And, having begun, he could give the final victory to either side any day. Yet the contest proceeds.”