Tag Archives: sing

Scripture at Sunrise 7.7.2015

“Sing, O heavens; and be joyful, O earth; and break forth into singing, O mountains: for the Lord hath comforted His people, and will have mercy upon His afflicted.” -Isaiah 49:13

So sweet are the comforts of the Lord, that not only the saints themselves may sing of them, but even the heavens and the earth may take up the song. It takes something to make a mountain sing; and yet the prophet summons quite a choir of them. Lebanon, and Sirion, and the high hills of Bashan and Moab, He would set them all singing because of Jehovah’s grace to His own Zion. May we not also make mountains of difficulty, and trial, and mystery, and labor become occasions for praise unto our God? “Break forth into singing, O mountains!”

This word of promise, that our God will have mercy upon His afflicted, has a whole peal of bells connected with it. Hear their music — “Sing!” “Be joyful!” “Break forth into singing.” The Lord would have His people happy because of His unfailing love. He would not have us sad and doubtful; He claims horn us the worship of believing hearts. He cannot fail us: why should we sigh or sulk as if He would do so? Oh, for a well-tuned harp! Oh, for voices like those of the cherubim before the throne!

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon]

Scripture at Sunrise 11.7.2011

Sunday Morning Worship | Luke 1:46-56 | Pastor Steve Wainright

“My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior.” -Luke 1:46

Mary’s song is Scripture-soaked. This little 12-14 year old girl has woven some deep theology into her worship. She’s rooted in the Word of God.

She brags about the Lord’s greatness. He is enlarged in her life. (Psalm 34:2-3) Think about His attributes. Ponder His mercy. The more you know about God, the greater ability you have to enlarge Him in your own life.

Because of her overwhelming thoughts and view of God, she overflows with joy. She was a humble individual, realizing she was a sinner…a nobody…but God visited her in a special way.

The focal point in her worship was the Lord. God her Savior. The One who is mighty. The Holy One. The merciful God.

A Song for Your Friday

I had the privilege of going to an Andrew Peterson concert last night on UK’s campus. I fell in love with Peterson’s music back in the fall and could listen to his music all day long; however, there’s something really special about seeing him sing live because you get to hear the stories behind his songs and see his emotion as he sings them. It was certainly a blessing.

I have a lot of favorites. I’ve never disliked one of his songs. This one I’m going to share with you today has such beautiful words. You will see that Peterson is careful with his words and uses each to the fullest. He’s a brilliant storyteller.

“Hosanna” means “save us now.” It was a Hebrew word that became a shout of praise. How beautiful that when you cry for help, it also becomes a shout of praise because you’re acknowledging your own sinfulness and realizing that Christ is the only one who can help.

“Hosanna” – Matthew 21:9, John 2:19, Genesis 3:15, Matthew 27:51
Words and Music by Andrew Peterson, Ben Shive, and Andy Gullahorn as heard on Resurrection Letters, Volume II (2008)

I am tangled up in contradiction.
I am strangled by my own two hands.
I am hunted by the hounds of addiction.
Hosanna!

I have lied to everyone who trusts me.
I have tried to fall when I could stand.
I have only loved the ones who loves me.
Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
See the long awaited king come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Come and tear the temple down.
Raise it up on holy ground. Hosanna!

I have struggled to remove this raiment,
tried to hide every shimmering strand.
I contend with these ghosts and these hosts of bright angels.
Hosanna!

I have cursed the man that you have made me,
as I have nursed the beast that bays for my blood.
Oh, I have run from the one who would save me.
Save me, Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
See the long awaited king, come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Come and tear the temple down.
Raise it up on holy ground. Hosanna!

You have crushed beneath your heel the vile serpent.
You have carried to the grave the black stain.
You have torn apart the temple’s holy curtain.
You have beaten Death at Death’s own game.
Hosanna!

O Hosanna!
Hail the long awaited king, come to set his people free.
We cry O Hosanna! Won’t you tear this temple down,
raise it up on holy ground.
O Hosanna! I will lift my voice and sing:
You have come and washed me clean. Hosanna.

Scripture at Sunrise 8.31.2010

“Sing, O barren.”  –Isaiah 54:1

Though we have brought forth some fruit unto Christ, and have a joyful hope that we are “plants of his own right hand planting,” yet there are times when we feel very barren. Prayer is lifeless, love is cold, faith is weak, each grace in the garden of our heart languishes and droops. We are like flowers in the hot sun, requiring the refreshing shower. In such a condition what are we to do? The text is addressed to us in just such a state. “Sing, O barren, break forth and cry aloud.” But what can I sing about? I cannot talk about the present, and even the past looks full of barrenness. Ah! I can sing of Jesus Christ. I can talk of visits which the Redeemer has aforetimes paid to me; or if not of these, I can magnify the great love wherewith he loved his people when he came from the heights of heaven for their redemption. I will go to the cross again. Come, my soul, heavy laden thou wast once, and thou didst lose thy burden there. Go to Calvary again. Perhaps that very cross which gave thee life may give thee fruitfulness. What is my barrenness? It is the platform for his fruit-creating power. What is my desolation? It is the black setting for the sapphire of his everlasting love. I will go in poverty, I will go in helplessness, I will go in all my shame and backsliding, I will tell him that I am still his child, and in confidence in his faithful heart, even I, the barren one, will sing and cry aloud.

Sing, believer, for it will cheer thine own heart, and the hearts of other desolate ones. Sing on, for now that thou art really ashamed of being barren, thou wilt be fruitful soon; now that God makes thee loath to be without fruit he will soon cover thee with clusters. The experience of our barrenness is painful, but the Lord’s visitations are delightful. A sense of our own poverty drives us to Christ, and that is where we need to be, for in him is our fruit found.

[from Spurgeon’s Morning & Evening, August 28 evening entry]

Scripture at Sunrise 8.27.2010

“The counsel of the Lord stands forever, the plans of His heart to all generations.” -Psalm 33:11

What is this?!  A post on a Friday?  Since when?!  Yes, this song has been in my head all week long.  We sang it at the Next Conference this year and it really fits what I've been thinking about all week: "From generation to generation, You never fail us, O God."  He is FAITHFUL!

How Great is Your Faithfulness

Now unto the king who reigns over all,
and never changes or turns
Unfailing justice, unfading grace,
Whose promises remain,
Yes, Your promises remain.

The heavens ring, the saints all sing,
Great is Your faithfulness
From age to age we will proclaim
Great is Your faithfulness,
How great is your faithfulness.

Everything changes, but You stay the same;
Your word and kingdom endure
We lean on the promise of all that You are,
and trust forevermore
we will trust forevermore.

From generation to generation
You never fail us, O God
Yesterday and today and tommorow
until the day You return

The heavens ring, the saints all sing,
Great is Your faithfulness
From age to age we will proclaim
Great is Your faithfulness,
How great is your faithfulness.

[by Jonas Myrin & Matt Redman; read a post about the album this comes from at Worship Matters]

Song at Sunrise 6.11.2010

O Great God of Highest Heaven

O great God of highest heaven
Occupy my lowly heart
Own it all and reign supreme
Conquer every rebel power
Let no vice or sin remain
That resists Your holy war
You have loved and purchased me
Make me Yours forevermore

I was blinded by my sin
Had no ears to hear Your voice
Did not know Your love within
Had no taste for heaven’s joys
Then Your Spirit gave me life
Opened up Your Word to me
Through the gospel of Your Son
Gave me endless hope and peace

Help me now to live a life
That’s dependent on Your grace
Keep my heart and guard my soul
From the evils that I face
You are worthy to be praised
With my every thought and deed
O great God of highest heaven
Glorify Your Name through me

[By Bob Kauflin; From the Valley of Vision CD ]

You can view a slideshow from Together for the Gospel 2010 and hear the 7000+ attendees sing this gorgeous prayer.

Scripture at Sunrise 9.4.09

“For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from Him.  He only is my rock and my salvation, my fortress; I shall not be shaken.  On God rests my salvation and my glory; my mighty rock, my refuge is God.  Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before Him; God is a refuge for us. Selah”  -Psalm 62:5-8

Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages, cleft for me,
let me hide myself in thee;
let the water and the blood,
from thy wounded side which flowed,
be of sin the double cure;
save from wrath and make me pure.

Not the labors of my hands
can fulfill thy law’s commands;
could my zeal no respite know,
could my tears forever flow,
all for sin could not atone;
thou must save, and thou alone.

Nothing in my hand I bring,
simply to the cross I cling;
naked, come to thee for dress;
helpless, look to thee for grace;
foul, I to the fountain fly;
wash me, Savior, or I die.

While I draw this fleeting breath,
when mine eyes shall close in death,
when I soar to worlds unknown,see thee on thy judgment throne,
Rock of Ages, cleft for me,
let me hide myself in thee.
[by Augustus Toplady, 1740-1778]

Story Behind the Song
It may seem strange that such a sedate hymn as “Rock of Ages” was written by a feisty, pugnacious man named Toplady.  Converted under a Methodist evangelist while attending the University of Dublin, Toplady decided to prepare for the ministry.  Though impressed with the spirit of Methodism, he strongly disagreed with the Wesleys’ Arminian theoloty and waged a running battle with them through tracts, sermons, and even hymns.  “Wesley,” said Toplady, “is guilty of Satan’s shamelessness.”  Wesley retorted, “I do not fight with chimney sweeps!” 

Toplady wrote “Rock of Ages” to conclude a magazine article in which he emphasized that, just as England could never repay its national debt, so humans through their own efforts could never satisfy the eternal justice of God.  He died of tuberculosis and overwork at the age of thirty-eight, two years after he published his own hymnal, in which “Rock of Ages” and Charles Wesley’s “Jesus, Lover of My Soul” were placed side by side.  (Read More)
[from The One Year Book of Hymns, July 19 entry]

Listen to Chris Rice’s version of this timeless hymn.