Tag Archives: words

Scripture at Sunrise 11.16.2021

“No weapon that is formed against thee shall prosper; and every tongue that shall rise against thee in judgment thou shalt condemn.” -Isaiah 54:17

There is great clatter in the forges and smithies of the enemy. They are making weapons wherewith to smite the saints. They could not even do as much as this if the Lord of saints did not allow them; for He has created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire. But see how busily they labor! How many swords and spears they fashion! It matters nothing, for on the blade of every weapon you may read this inscription: It shall not Prosper.

But now listen to another noise: it is the strife of tongues. Tongues are more terrible instruments than can be made with hammers and anvils, and the evil which they inflict cuts deeper and spreads wider. What will become of us now? Slander, falsehood, insinuation, ridicule-these are poisoned arrows; how can we meet them? The Lord God promises us that, if we cannot silence them, we shall, at least, escape from being ruined by them. They condemn us for the moment, but we shall condemn them at last and forever. The mouth of them that speak lies shall be stopped, and their falsehoods shall be turned to the honor of those good men who suffered by them.

[from Faith’s Checkbook by Charles H. Spurgeon]

Scripture at Sunrise 09.20.2021

“Speak not evil one of another, brethren. He that speaketh evil of his brother, and judgeth his brother, speaketh evil of the law, and judgeth the law: but if thou judge the law, thou art not a doer of the law, but a judge. There is one lawgiver, who is able to save and to destroy: who art thou that judgest another?” -James 4:11-12

Words can kill and can be very destructive. It’s easy to put other people down, but when you speak against someone, you’re putting yourself above God’s law. -Pastor Steve Wainright (excerpts from Sunday Morning Sermon “Putting Others Down” from James 4:11-12)

Scripture at Sunrise 6.18.2020

ThursdayTheologicalTweet

She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue. -Proverbs 31:26

Lord, save me from the sins of my tongue and the flaws of character that fuel them. Make my words honest (by taking away my fear), few (by taking away my self-importance), wise (by taking away my thoughtlessness), and kind (by taking away my indifference and irritability). Amen. -Tim Keller via Twitter

Scripture at Sunrise 8.29.2016

What Your Mouth Reveals | Romans 3:13-14 | Steve Wainright
“Their throat is an open grave; they use their tongues to deceive.” “The venom of asps is under their lips.” “Their mouth is full of curses and bitterness.” -Romans 3:13-14

The mouth of a sinner is like an open grave. The smell of death comes from the heart and the stench of a rottening body is in the sinner’s mouth. Your tongue can cut people to pieces.

We all stand as guilty sinners before God. So how do we get rid of the guilt that comes from sin? The only way to get rid of that guilt is to confess that sin to God and put your faith and trust in Christ’s work on the cross. When you trust in Christ, He gives you a new vocabulary and the restraining power of His Holy Spirit. When guilt is there, that is a sign that the Spirit of God is there, showing you that you are a sinner.
May your words be few and seasoned with grace.

-excerpts from Steve Wainright’s Morning Sermon

——-Audio——-
Sunday Morning Sermon Audio: What Your Mouth Reveals | Romans 3:13-14 | Steve Wainright
Sunday Evening Sermon: Everlasting Life | John 3:16 | Anthony Vance

Scripture at Sunrise 10.21.2015

“Your words were found, and I ate them, and Your words became to me a joy and the delight of my heart, for I am called by Your Name, O LORD, God of hosts.” -Jeremiah 15:16

“Open the Bible every day, and don’t let go of it until God shows up to make it precious to you.” -John Piper via Desiring God

Scripture at Sunrise 8.21.2013

“Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear.” -Ephesians 4:29

Don’t miss the opportunity to speak life into someone today. Our words have incredible power & are full of glory when we stir each other up. -Mike Donehey via Twitter

 

Scripture at Sunrise 10.10.08

“He leadeth me beside still waters, He restoreth my soul.”
Psalm 23:1-3

Our kids learned this song on Wednesday night in their class. With such wonderful words, I had to share it with you! I think of Sugrim every time I hear this song because he was singing it to the top of his lungs one morning while we were there when I was really little. It was actually written by the song of a New Hampshire governor. (Read more about him and the story behind the song below).

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He leadeth me, O blessèd thought!
O words with heav’nly comfort fraught!
Whate’er I do, where’er I be
Still ’tis God’s hand that leadeth me.

He leadeth me, He leadeth me,
By His own hand He leadeth me;
His faithful follower I would be,
For by His hand He leadeth me.

Sometimes mid scenes of deepest gloom,
Sometimes where Eden’s bowers bloom,
By waters still, over troubled sea,
Still ’tis His hand that leadeth me.

Lord, I would place my hand in Thine,
Nor ever murmur nor repine;
Content, whatever lot I see,
Since ’tis my God that leadeth me.

And when my task on earth is done,
When by Thy grace the vict’ry’s won,
E’en death’s cold wave I will not flee,
Since God through Jordan leadeth me.
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As a young man who re­cent­ly had been grad­u­at­ed from Brown Un­i­ver­si­ty and New­ton The­o­lo­gic­al In­sti­tu­tion, I was sup­ply­ing for a cou­ple of Sun­days the pul­pit of the First Bap­tist Church in Phil­a­del­phia [Penn­syl­van­ia]. At the mid-week ser­vice, on the 26th of March, 1862, I set out to give the peo­ple an ex­po­si­tion of the Twen­ty-third Psalm, which I had giv­en be­fore on three or four oc­ca­sions, but this time I did not get fur­ther than the words “He Lead­eth Me.” Those words took hold of me as they had ne­ver done be­fore, and I saw them in a sig­ni­fi­cance and won­drous beau­ty of which I had ne­ver dreamed.

It was the dark­est hour of the Ci­vil War. I did not re­fer to that fact-that is, I don’t think I did-but it may sub­con­sciou­sly have led me to real­ize that God’s lead­er­ship is the one sig­nif­i­cant fact in hu­man ex­per­i­ence, that it makes no dif­fer­ence how we are led, or whi­ther we are led, so long as we are sure God is lead­ing us.

At the close of the meet­ing a few of us in the par­lor of my host, good Dea­con Watt­son, kept on talk­ing about the thought which I had em­pha­sized; and then and there, on a blank page of the brief from which I had in­tend­ed to speak, I pen­ciled the hymn, talk­ing and writ­ing at the same time, then hand­ed it to my wife and thought no more about it. She sent it to The Watch­man and Re­flect­or, a pa­per pub­lished in Bos­ton, where it was first print­ed. I did not know un­til 1865 that my hymn had been set to mu­sic by Will­iam B. Brad­bu­ry. I went to Ro­ches­ter [New York] to preach as a can­di­date be­fore the Se­cond Bap­tist Church. Go­ing in­to their cha­pel on ar­riv­al in the ci­ty, I picked up a hymn­al to see what they were sing­ing, and opened it at my own hymn, “He Lead­eth Me.”

-Joseph H. Gilmore, author of “He Leadeth Me”

Read more about this hymn and its author at CyberHymnal.